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Flame Rectification

Posted: Sun Dec 25, 2016 10:50 pm
by CEO1
We're all familiar with the "application" of the flame rectification principle...and I've read many articles about it over the years, yet didn't fully understand the "why or how" behind it. I just thought it was one of Mother Nature's unexplainable phenomenons.

Rectification is actually a modified application of flame "conductivity", which results from the flame creating ionized particles with positive and negative charges. And it's those "ions" that are attracted to electrodes with opposite polarity. All these years, I was under the impression a flame would conduct a DC current as a result of an applied, DC voltage. Changing the geometry of the electrodes, is what generates the DC circuit. I knew about the geometry thing, but still didn't put it together with the conductivity thing.

How about that...
:)

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Re: Flame Rectification

Posted: Mon Dec 26, 2016 8:13 pm
by AC480
I knew that a flame would conduct electricity, but didn't or don't remember exactly why. It's interesting how the method of electronic flame rectification changed and why. I liked the old thermocouples. Very simple. A rod with 2 dissimilar wires wrapped around each other the generated a small electric current.

Re: Flame Rectification

Posted: Tue Dec 27, 2016 8:31 am
by CEO1
AC480 wrote:I knew that a flame would conduct electricity, but didn't or don't remember exactly why. It's interesting how the method of electronic flame rectification changed and why.


Well, if Google, with its present day effectiveness, had been available 30 years ago, I'd have learned a lot more, a lot sooner... :mrgreen: I dealt with furnaces years before reading just the part about the flame rod having an AC voltage applied to it.

The only reason leading me to this newer information was reading a misinformed comment suggesting the temperature of the flame rod had something to do with the current flow...I think the commenter was confusing flame conductivity with the thermocouple principle.


I liked the old thermocouples. Very simple. A rod with 2 dissimilar wires wrapped around each other the generated a small electric current.


I still deal with some older standing pilot furnaces and thermocouples...they are simple as well as reliable. And it doesn't matter if they get "dirty", like flame rods. :)